Best Stocks To Buy

Finding the best stocks to buy is never easy. It’s probably the reason you’re visiting this website.

But determining which stocks to buy isn’t just about the “what”. It’s also about when to buy them.

Take Apple (AAPL), for example. Everybody knows Apple. It’s the world’s richest and perhaps most visible company. If you had bought shares of Apple when started trading at roughly $0.50 in 1981, you’d most likely be a millionaire by now. More realistically, if you had bought the stock at any point in the last decade, you would have also made a hefty profit.

However, say you bought Apple when it reached its peak at $700 a share in August 2012 and sold it out of frustration after it plummeted 40% over the ensuing nine months. For long-term investors in Apple, that steep decline looks like little more than a brief hiccup on the road to major profits. But for those who got in at the wrong time, you actually lost money on Apple.

At Cabot Investing Advice, we try to provide our subscribers with the “what” and the “when”. The right stocks to buy now may be very different from the right stocks to buy in a year or two. Thus, when people ask us, “What are the best stocks to buy?” our answer is inevitably, “that depends.”

Like human beings, every stock goes through its ups and downs, its good times and bad. The best stocks – the Apples, the Googles, the Exxons – rise over time. But that doesn’t mean they’re the best stocks to buy at any given moment.

In reality, the best stocks to buy depend on your personal preference as an investor. No one stock, or even group of stocks, is right for every investor. Much depends on your risk tolerance, how long you like to stay invested in a given position, and what you want your investments to do for you.

For example, if you are a growth-oriented investor, you naturally seek out companies whose earnings are growing faster than the market’s, and that appear primed to continue doing so well into the future. These companies generally have steady cash flow and upward-trending stock charts.

On the other hand, if you are a value-oriented investor, you look for companies that are undervalued – stocks that haven’t necessarily been rising because they have fallen temporarily out of favor. Value investors search for bargains based on low price-to-earnings or price-to-book ratios. Their charts and earnings growth may not look good now, but there’s reason to believe they may in the future.

Growth stocks and value stocks are two very different things. Dividend stocks – or stocks that pay an ever-increasing dividend but don’t necessarily have the same share-price appreciation as a growth stock – are another investing avenue, generally favored by income investors.

The right stocks to buy depend on what stocks you’re looking for – and when you’re looking for them. Fortunately, at Cabot Investing Advice we have something for every type of investor. Our 12 investment advisories include value newsletters, growth newsletters, dividend newsletters, emerging-market newsletters – even two options services.

Featured Stock Picks

Each write-up features commentary on the picks from one or more of our expert stock market analysts, as well as company details and a stock chart.


Dividend Stocks

Dividend stocks aren’t going to make you rich overnight. They can significantly build up your nest egg if you buy and hold them for years, or even decades.»

Small Cap Stocks

Investing in Small-Cap Stocks is one of the best ways to make huge returns-- if you can handle the risk.»

Growth Stocks

Investing in Growth Stocks can be like looking for a needle in a haystack, but the triple-digit returns make it all worthwhile.»

Value Stocks

"Buy Low, Sell High" is one of the oldest investing rules in the book. If you want to live by it, invest in value stocks. But how to find them?»

Canadian Stocks

Canadian stocks might not deliver the same returns as China or India. But they’re also less likely to go belly up if another financial crisis strikes.»

Forever Stocks

Forever Stocks don't need to be sold to make money. You can count on them to be viable not only today, but 20 or 30 years from now.»

Chinese Stocks

When seeking better-than-average growth, many investors flock to emerging markets. And in emerging markets investing, Chinese stocks are your best bet.»

Emerging Markets Stocks

Emerging markets stocks are among the fastest-growing investments in the global marketplace. The rapid growth of emerging markets is what makes their stocks so appealing. »

Retirement Stocks

One in three Americans will run out of money in retirement. A good way to avoid that trap is to invest in retirement stocks.»

Stock Picks

Ross Stores

McKesson (MCK) distributes ethical and proprietary drugs, surgical supplies and health and beauty products throughout North America to the healthcare industry. The company also provides technical consulting services to biotech and pharmaceutical manufacturers.

Carnival Cruise Lines

Having just returned from vacation, Tim Lutts is thinking of the millions of baby-boomers who are spending more and more money on leisure travel, particularly on cruises, an industry that is dominated by a few big players.

China Biologic Products

Paul Goodwin advises putting this stock on your watch list.

Cabot Wealth Advisory

Do Your Stocks Have Borrowing Trouble?

By Nancy Zambell on July 28, 2015

Hostess is making news today as it is issuing $1.23 million in term loans—most of which will go toward paying $905 million in a special dividend to its private shareholders—which I may add, is also more than two times what the buyers paid for this tasty snack business, and triples the company’s debt. According to Bloomberg, these types of deals grew to nearly $16 billion in the second quarter, the highest level in the past 12 months. I’m not making a judgment for or against this action. I just want to make a point that this debt, or leverage recapitalization—spurred by low interest rates—is increasingly becoming a method in which private equity holders get their money back—without selling the business. But it does burden the company with additional debt, which isn’t going to fund company expansion or operations.Read More >

Sell Apple

By Timothy Lutts on July 27, 2015

Today, I’m writing on a MacBook Pro. This morning I did my morning crossword puzzle on my iPad. All day long, my iPhone is by my side. My home Wi-Fi comes from Apple AirPorts. And some nights, I stream entertainment through my Apple TV. In short, I love Apple products, and I expect to continue using them for many more years. But one of the most important market truisms is this: “The company is not the stock.”Read More >

Sunny Days

By Paul Goodwin on July 24, 2015

Every year, usually on a Thursday in July, most of the Cabot crew gathers in Salem, jumps into cars and heads north. With bathroom breaks and a stop to purchase refreshing beverages (ahem), the group drives through New Hampshire’s tiny seacoast neck and winds up in Kittery, Maine, at the Chauncey Creek Lobster Pound. There, lobsters, baked beans, coleslaw, steamers, mussels and (importantly) chips are consumed and the store of tissue-restoring beverages is significantly reduced.Read More >