Japanese Cell Phone Makers Tap Android

 

Japanese cell phone makers are attempting to enter the growing worldwide mobile device market by adopting Google’s (GOOG) Android according to the New York Times.

Japanese mobile phones are already more advanced than many on the market elsewhere, with some that double as credit cards, can display digital TV broadcasts and are equipped with solar cells. But the Times reported that Japanese cell phones haven’t taken off elsewhere in a market dominated by Apple (AAPL), Research in Motion (RIMM) and Samsung.

To better compete internationally, Japanese cell phone makers like Sharp, Sony Ericsson, NEC and Kyocera will all adopt Google’s Android mobile operating system. According to the Times, Sharp has already introduced a line of tablet computers running Android to the U.S. market to compete with the iPad.

Apple’s iPhone initially overshadowed devices running the Android operating system, but the number of Android numbers is now rising rapidly, the Times reported. Worldwide sales of Android phones hit 67.2 million units in 2010, way ahead of the 46 million units for the iPhone.

GOOG and AAPL are both Cabot Top Ten Weekly stocks.


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Tesla Motors

If you’re not on board the stock, there’s no rush. Wait for a better entry point in a more constructive market.

Church

Church & Dwight owns the Arm & Hammer, OxiClean and Trojan brands, as well as some smaller, faster-growing brands. But even after a 35% climb in 18 months, Church & Dwight still looks strong and poised for further gains.

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Restoration Hardware (RH) has been on my watch list for a long time. Believe it or not, I’ve been watching the stock for about a year—it was my Top Pick at the 2014 Cabot Investors Conference, nearly one year ago—and now, after a ton of starts and stops, shares look poised to get going.

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